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Tool Kit

Discussion in 'Featured Articles & How To's' started by AlpineIan, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. AlpineIan

    AlpineIan SAOCA Founder

    The Complete Alpine Tool Kit
    by
    Ian Spencer

    For some time now, I have been reading and contributing to discussions about the evasive Sunbeam Alpine tool kit. These little rascals must have been the first thing to have been lost from most Alpines and are today, quite a rare find. Sort of the "Holy Grail" of all Alpine parts. I have tried to make some logical sense out of this by documenting actual kits the way they came from honest low mileage cars and cross referencing with the Rootes parts manuals. I believe this to be a very accurate representation of the way an Alpine should have been equipped. However, there may be discrepancies. After all, we are dealing with manufacturing and production assembly that took place over 30 years ago. With that in mind, not all kits may have been created equal. Still, this should provide a very good and closely accurate guide for those of you that are piecing your tool kits together.



    Valve & spark plug gauge - P.56922 ( 2 1/4")
    Tyre valve key - P.56922 ( 2")
    Distributor key - P.41129 ( 2 1/8") Now these little guys were definitely the first to get lost. The tyre valve key was offered in brass for SI & SII kits. S3 and beyond had the yellow plastic one. The distributor key has a small screwdriver on the end and a feeler gauge for setting the points. The valve and spark plug gauge is a very uncommon find. One blade is stamped PLUGS. Low grade plating.

    Spanners (Superslim)
    These wrenches read:
    13/16" x 11/16"
    3/4" x 5/8"
    11/16" x 19/32"
    9/16" x 1/2"
    1/2" x 7/16"
    That's slightly different from what the parts book reads. This set came in a complete tool kit out of a very low mileage one owner Series II. Notice that there are 5 wrenches instead of 4 like the parts book indicates. From this evidence, I must assume that some kits had 5, while others only had 4. Black oxidePliers - P.79756
    The detail reads TW made in England. Black oxideSpanner (adjustable) - P.41399
    This is the famous King Dick Adjustable Spanner. Detail reads KING DICK on the sliding portion.  Black oxideNave plate extractor - P.102286
    This tool has no markings. Early cars had a thin one (7/16") while the late cars had a thicker one ( 3/4"). It's for removing the hub caps.  5" Black oxideOil sump wrench- 9221200
    Your basic 1/2"allen key. No markings. Only came with cars that were fitted with the recessed oil sump plug. 6 3/8" Black oxide Box spanner - 9221514
    & Tommy bar - P.53782
    I wouldn't want to change my plugs with this set up, but that's what it's for. Black oxide w/ no markings.Grease gun - P.45610
    Series I & II up to B9101330 Reads:TECALEMIT - ENGLAND Cast aluminum finishHammer (Alloy)- 1206425
    All the suppressions point to this guy. I suspect sometime during  Series II production since this was original equipment in a late Harrington Le Mans. Thor?

     Hammer (Alloy)
    1206425


    Most commonly found in this condition. From
    a late SII Alpine.

    Hammer 
    (double copper)
    1201623

    Manufactured by Thor. This one came from an early Series II Alpine. The 1201623 Thor copper & nylon hammer is identical except one end has a nylon or raw hide insert. (sorry no picture) Screwdriver P.79758

    No markings.
    Wood handle
    Black oxide

    Tool roll - 1219610 (Plastic) S3, IV,V.
    Black plastic with cloth tie straps. 5 pockets. Tool roll - P.100976 (Canvas) SI & SII
    Canvas with a black textured backing.
    5 pockets and cloth tie straps. Starting Handle - 1201332
    24.5" in length. Black paint with rotating handle. No markings.
    Starting Handle - 1224441
    Not yet identified as to what the difference may be. any ideas?Lifting jack- 5220473 (grey paint)
    For SV's B395000596 and after. 19" Shelley - Made in England
    Lifting jack - 12011342 (black paint)
    For all Alpines up to B395000595.  20" Shelley - Made in England

    Lifting jack decal. Shelley - Made in England
    Located 12" from top on center, extension side. Knock off spanner - 1206003
    For removing the octagonal hub nuts on Alpines with wire wheels. Only supplied in cars equipped with the octagonal knock offs. Black oxide.

    Wheel brace - P.113516
    This tool has two uses. To remove the lug nuts and a cranking handle for lifting the jack.  I think this tools diameter was increased sometime during later Alpine production, probably to increase it's strength. Reads 3/4" A/F 199 Black paint.
     
  2. 49fl

    49fl Gold Level Sponsor

    Possible Starting Handle Differences

    Ian,
    I have 2 completely different Starting Handles. One came out of my SV that is shown in the tool kit description. The second is much shorter along the shaft that passes through the front below the radiator. They are definitely not inchangeable, in other words the shorter shaft will not start a SV Alpine, however I remember the reverse is true. If you would like, I can dig both out and forward a picture of both together.
    Jim
    65 HRO OD
     
  3. kha1967

    kha1967 Donation Time

    Valve & spark plug gauge - P.56922

    Hi Ian

    I'm aware that there are two different Valve & spark plug gauge, both with the same part no. P.56922. The differents is that one has two "blades" (inl 0.10 - ex 0.15) and the third is staped "plug". The other has two blades where both exhaust and inlet measures .010! Can you help me which one is the correct for my Sunbeam Alpine Series IV.

    Kind regards
    Kenneth Hansen
     

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