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Flywheel bushing

Thor 1211

Silver Level Sponsor
Replacing the clutch on my Series V, I found that the brass bushing in the flywheel was loose, had a bit of play and could be pulled out with my finger. I believe that the bushing should be pressed in and tight inside the flywheel. Is the "loosness" acceptable or should I just go ahead and get a new bushing. My worry is that the flywheel journal may be worn and that a new bushing won't make a difference. I definitely don't want to have to replace the flywheel.
 

DanR

Diamond Level Sponsor
You could remove the flywheel, verify whether it is damaged or not, if damaged have it "fixed" at a machine shop along with a new bushing.
 

Barry

Diamond Level Sponsor
Loctite 680 is your friend. It will hold that bushing in place.


Holding the pilot bushing in place is easy; the hard part is making sure the I.D. of the bushing is properly aligned axially and radially with the crankshaft main journal centerline. Proper meaning no more than about 0.0015" run-out. Glue doesn't align.
 

hartmandm

Moderator
Diamond Level Sponsor
Purchase a new pilot bushing and verify you can't just push it into place using a finger. Then you probably are ok size wise. Then soak the bushing in engine oil a couple of days and then chill it in the freezer before installation.
 

Thor 1211

Silver Level Sponsor
I've ordered a new bushing and will do as hartmanmd suggests. if that doesn't work out, Loctite 680 will be my last resort.
Thanks to all for your advice.
 

Mikeflbmer

Bronze Level Sponsor
Replacing the clutch on my Series V, I found that the brass bushing in the flywheel was loose, had a bit of play and could be pulled out with my finger. I believe that the bushing should be pressed in and tight inside the flywheel. Is the "loosness" acceptable or should I just go ahead and get a new bushing. My worry is that the flywheel journal may be worn and that a new bushing won't make a difference. I definitely don't want to have to replace the flywheel.
I would think that the bushing being brass would wear before the steel in the flywheel.....BUT since it is all apart get a new bushing and flywheel if necessary..... seeing that it is 2.8 v6 try posting your question on mustang 11 blog or forum
 

DanR

Diamond Level Sponsor
I assumed he was referring to a SV Alpine (1725 engine).

If perhaps it is a FORD 2.8 V6 mated to a T5 I have the bushings available, just need rthe OD of the input shaft (spud).
 

Thor 1211

Silver Level Sponsor
The motor is a 1725 and the transmission is a Series V with overdrive done up by John Roseby in England. The V6 is sitting on an engine stand waiting for its new oil pump, distributor and oil pan to go on to be put into the Series I when I get the time (that's a whole different story).

I don't know how scared I should be when Barry says the runout should not exceed .0015. I have ordered a new bushing with the hope that the one I took out is worn and not the crankshaft journal. I hope the new bushing will measure up better because right now the slop is around .025.
 

Barry

Diamond Level Sponsor
The motor is a 1725 and the transmission is a Series V with overdrive done up by John Roseby in England. The V6 is sitting on an engine stand waiting for its new oil pump, distributor and oil pan to go on to be put into the Series I when I get the time (that's a whole different story).

I don't know how scared I should be when Barry says the runout should not exceed .0015. I have ordered a new bushing with the hope that the one I took out is worn and not the crankshaft journal. I hope the new bushing will measure up better because right now the slop is around .025.


There are undoubtedly lots of manual transmission vehicles with more than 0.0015" runout on the transmission input shaft pilot bearing. It is not instant death for a low mileage vehicle, but it forces the front of the input shaft to "wobble" with every revolution and will eventually cause trouble.

0.025" is a LOT of slop. Is the slop between the pilot bearing and the crankshaft or between the pilot bearing and the "spud" on the transmission input shaft? Maybe some of both? The cast iron crankshaft and the steel transmission input shaft are much harder than the bronze pilot shaft bushing and should not normally show any significant wear.
 

husky drvr

Platinum Level Sponsor
transmission is a Series V with overdrive done up by John Roseby

Thor,

Just curious because of your statement about your OD transmission being a replacement.

Do you have any idea if the bushing was loose at the time of that installation?
 

Thor 1211

Silver Level Sponsor
The "slop" measures .025 overall on the crank (.0125, I guess, in any direction) and about .015 overall on the spud.
When I got the transmission from Jeff Howarth in England, (John Roseby had rebuilt it) I used the existing clutch, bell housing, throw out bearing etc. and didn't even think to look at the crank/flywheel end. That was over 15 years ago and until last year, when the clutch went, it was all trouble free.

I'm holding my breath hoping its just bushing wear or a wrong sized bushing. But I'll know for sure when I measure the new bearing.
 

Barry

Diamond Level Sponsor
I recommend that you also measure the diameter of the spud and the diameter of the hole in the crankshaft (not flywheel) into which the input shaft bushing is inserted. Something isn't right.
 

puff4

Platinum Level Sponsor
I may be a nut, but I don't really see a problem with a small bit of play in the pilot bushing. Yes, it should be an interference fit in the crank aperture, but the play between the input shaft spigot and the actual bearing itself needn't be terribly tight... .010" would be acceptable to me, but yes, perhaps .025 is a wee bit much. However, remember that that bearing is only really doing its job when the clutch is depressed - it is otherwise in a fixed position during normal driving. Now, of course, you don't want the input shaft to be out of alignment too much, but remember that it is floating in a fairly large ball bearing (which has considerable play) and the other end houses the needle bearing to the mainshaft, which is only operational when the car is in neutral. So, the only bearing that will notice any 'wobble' will be that rather large ball bearing in the center of the input shaft.
 

Thor 1211

Silver Level Sponsor
The crank journal measures 7/8 and the spud 5/8, both +/- .005 or so, so I'm thinking the old bushing is just worn and/or an improperly sized. So when it get here, the new bushing is going in Loctite or no Loctite and I'm going to live with any slop. I sort of agree with Puff4 on what's acceptable. In any event, I'm betting the new bushing is 7/8 o/d and 5/8 i/d but I'm not yet sure about the length.
 
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