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what torque

Discussion in '"Stock" Alpine' started by Limey, Apr 25, 2020.

  1. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Hi All

    I can't find the torque for this nut (51) in the workshop manual. Can anybody advise how to correctly tighten this?

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. bernd_st

    bernd_st Bronze Level Sponsor

    Oliver, there apparently is none. The castellated nut is only locking the "adjustment nut" in order to ensure the recommended end float . Pls. see the relevant portion from the manual here:

    IMG_20200425_124352.jpg

    P.S. I think the end float is a bit to much...
     
  3. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Thanks Bernd. Perfect! All done. Where was that printed?
     
  4. bernd_st

    bernd_st Bronze Level Sponsor

    Great then. It's a description from my very early Workshop Manual only catering for SI/II & Rapier. Hardbound for Hackney Library. Don't actually recall where I got it from. Perhaps from Pooks bookstore ;)
     
  5. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Good find! I use Pooks also. Strange that this was not in the Alpine Workshop manual...

    In the end I just pinched the thrust washer and slackened back to find the split pin hole
     
  6. bernd_st

    bernd_st Bronze Level Sponsor

    It seems to be a rare copy printed in 1961. Appearantly big effort taken to make it hardbound. Special treatment for Libraries ?
    IMG_20200426_210956.jpg
     
  7. moonstone SIV

    moonstone SIV Donation Time

    Oliver,

    The rubber gaiter in your pic should be fitted higher so that it covers the swivel/fiber washer area to prevent the ingress of...crap.

    I usually use a section of bicycle inner tube which can be trimmed to a longer length. Not factory correct of course but does a better job than the tired bit of rubber included in a 50 yo QH kit!

    Can you do something about the surface rust beginning to form on those fasteners too please....:p
     
  8. 65beam

    65beam Donation Time

    Every thing under this car got the Triple P treatment. Painted, Plated or Powder coated. Couldn't do anything to the rotors. The underneath of the body has the same paint finish. No under coating. Limey's car looks to have fasteners fresh out of the box which is how it was done when built. 110_0379.JPG
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2020
  9. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Your are right. Everything is as factory. Since that picture I've detailed the front axle again and covered bolts and bare steel in grease.
    I drive it in all weathers (never trailered) so I knew I'd get some degradation but easy enough to tidy up.
    I'm experimenting with hot oil blacking with graphite powder for the bolts. I'll see how they age.
    Oliver
     
  10. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Hi Basil,
    Nice to hear from you. That's not rust mate, That's period correct patina! I use mountain bike inner tube as it's a lot thicker than standard
     
  11. moonstone SIV

    moonstone SIV Donation Time

    I'm well aware of the difference between a factory correct restoration and one that includes as much bling as possible...
     
  12. moonstone SIV

    moonstone SIV Donation Time

    Oliver,

    Yes, even a few drops of oil on an item will suffice in keeping surface corrosion from forming. The grease sounds very appropriate, after it's first service at the Rootes Dealer it would have ended up smeared in it anyway...!
     
  13. 65beam

    65beam Donation Time

    There are other ways to detail fasteners, washers, etc. without applying grease or oil and there is no bling.
     
  14. alpine_64

    alpine_64 Donation Time

    Its what they're built for... And its a lot more fun driving a well sorted car than just looking at a fresh build and taking it up and down a hauler ramp ;-)
     
  15. hartmandm

    hartmandm Moderator Diamond Level Sponsor

    I think we are good on the torque for the nut.

    Mike
     
  16. 65beam

    65beam Donation Time

    I agree. We used to drive them everywhere. Probably the most memorable trip in the series 5 was getting onto Skyline Drive at Front Royal, Va. and continuing on into N. Carolina by way of the Blue Ridge Parkway.That was before life, getting older and the wife's health got in the way. Now we have two tow vehicles and two trailers. It happens to everyone eventually. Just check out the trailer parking lot at a United here in the states.
     
  17. 65beam

    65beam Donation Time

    Over the years it seems I had more problems with the early suspensions than the later ones. Mainly wear of the lower king pins. Is there any one in the U.K. that has reproduced the front suspension king pin kits for the early suspension?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2020
  18. Limey

    Limey Gold Level Sponsor

    Try Rootes Parts in Holland - He has very good suspension parts including those I think
    Oliver
     
  19. bernd_st

    bernd_st Bronze Level Sponsor

    The lower kingpins only wear if they are not regularly greased or water/dirt finds it's way into the assembly. Therefore I like the bicycle tube idea mentioned earlier. Partially you can use the Holland parts specifically the king pin bits, but not for the fulcrum bushes. I have changed towards rescuing originals as much as I can nowadays...
     
  20. 65beam

    65beam Donation Time

    I was curious as to whether anyone was making better parts. I just trash the early suspension and switch to the later one. I have a complete unit on the shelf that Doug at Tiger Auto recently built for me. It'll go under #2251 LeMans when I get that far.
     

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