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Think it's as easy as easy as riding a bike?

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by husky drvr, Mar 13, 2021.

  1. husky drvr

    husky drvr Platinum Level Sponsor

    Maybe not ...

     
    Alpine 1789 and puff4 like this.
  2. MikeH

    MikeH Platinum Level Sponsor

    A group had a bike like that at the Daytona Turkey Run Car Show in Daytona Beach a few years ago when I was there. You won something (don’t remember what) if you could ride it for a set distance. I tried a few times. I never felt so uncoordinated in my life. It really does mess you up.
     
  3. puff4

    puff4 Gold Level Sponsor

    Next devilish step.... put a crossover in the chain and make the pedals go backwards.
     
    John W likes this.
  4. husky drvr

    husky drvr Platinum Level Sponsor

    More info about riding a bike:

     
  5. Bill Blue

    Bill Blue Platinum Level Sponsor

    Glad to see the impact of steering on balance. I have long posited that gyroscopic forces of bicycle wheels cannot be great enough to keep a rider upright. Never won that argument, mostly because elementary physics says it is true.

    Bill
     
  6. MikeH

    MikeH Platinum Level Sponsor

    Yes, but once you get up to speed you can ride and steer with no hands.
    I think the steering is used on the initial start in order to maintain balance.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2021
  7. husky drvr

    husky drvr Platinum Level Sponsor

    1967 Gyro-X - sort of:

     
  8. Bill Blue

    Bill Blue Platinum Level Sponsor

    Perfect example of steering supplying balance. Notice that when riding with no hands, the rider is almost continuously shifting his weight back and forth with the bikes steering geometry responding with steering and keeping him upright.

    Bill
     
  9. Barry

    Barry Platinum Level Sponsor

    A bicycle certainly has no appreciable gyroscopic effect at slow speed and I seriously doubt the effect even at high speed. At 5 MPH, the wheels / tires (700c32) on my bike are only rotating about once per second. IMO, there is just not enough rotational velocity or rotating mass to create any useful level of gyroscopic stabilization.
     
  10. Bill Blue

    Bill Blue Platinum Level Sponsor

    That was my argument, only to be answered with "it's obviously enough to do the job".
    Bill
     
  11. husky drvr

    husky drvr Platinum Level Sponsor

    Barry and Bill,

    You both need to go back and rewatch post #4's video again and pay particular attention to everything AFTER the 4:45 time mark.

    Also, keep in mind that riding a bike is ultimately a combined system of bike and rider. Either can operate to some degree without the other, but together the system IS better than the sum of the parts.
     
  12. MikeH

    MikeH Platinum Level Sponsor

    Bill, if that is the way you took my comment, that surely was not my intent.
     
  13. Barry

    Barry Platinum Level Sponsor

    As Galileo discovered, discussions that revolve (pun intended) around belief versus science seldom end well.

    If anyone is interested in discussing the science, please send a PM.
     
  14. Bill Blue

    Bill Blue Platinum Level Sponsor

    No, this was in response to Barry's comment about gyroscopic forces, especially at low speed. No challenge intended to anyone. Sorry 'bout that.
    Bill
     

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